Arthur Miller Plays

In the history of postwar American art and politics, Arthur Miller casts a long shadow as a playwright of stunning range and power whose works held up a mirror to America and its shifting values. The Penguin Arthur Miller celebrates Miller’s creative and intellectual legacy by bringing together the breadth of his plays, which span the decades from the 1930s to the new millennium. From his quiet debut, The Man Who Had All the Luck, and All My Sons, the follow-up that established him as a major talent, to career hallmarks like The Crucible and Death of a Salesman, and later works like Mr. Peters’ Connections and Resurrection Blues, the range and courage of Miller’s moral and artistic vision are here on full display. Including eighteen plays—some known by all and others that will come as discoveries to many readers—The Penguin Arthur Miller is a collectible treasure for fans of Miller’s drama and an indispensable resource for students of the theatre. The Penguin Arthur Miller includes: The Man Who Had All the LuckAll My SonsDeath of a SalesmanAn Enemy of the PeopleThe CrucibleA View from the BridgeAfter the FallIncident at VichyThe PriceThe Creation of the World and Other BusinessThe Archbishop’s CeilingThe American ClockPlaying for TimeThe Ride Down Mt. MorganThe Last YankeeBroken GlassMr. Peters’ Connections, and Resurrection Blues. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,500 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
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Scary Readers Theatre

Scary stories from around the world. From the deliciously ghostly and eerie to the startling and down-right scary, thes readers theatre scripts are guaranteed to capture your students' attention and enhance their reading skills. Drawn from 30 folktales, Greek myths, ghost stories, and modern urban legends, they will make you and your students listen, wonder, shiver, chuckle, and even jump! Invaluable for the language arts program and for use with beginning and remedial readers, this collection includes many familiar stories that students will recognize and enjoy. Scripts have been evaluated using the Flesch-Kincaid Readability Scale and are organized according to reading level. The book also includes helpful guidelines and tips for bringing readers theatre into the classroom.
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Passing Game: A Drama in Two Acts

Passing Game is an exploration of guilt, retribution and disillusionment. Two once promising actors, one white and one black, have descended to doing commercials and voice overs. At a seedy, deserted resort, the two engage in increasingly violent basketball games while they plot to do away with their wives reminders of their failure. Unexplained killings have already occurred in the area and the two men hope the murderer will oblige by making their wives his next rifle fodder. Barring that, they make a pact to dispose of each other's wife. Others inhabiting this sinister locale are a creepy, gun toting caretaker, his nasty nephew and the nephew's former girl friend, a natural prey for these two predatory men. Murder does take place, but not the one they've planned. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Tribute

Scottie Templeton's a charming, irresponsible fellow. A sometime Broadway press agent and former scriptwriter, he's everyone's friend, nobody's hero and a great womanizer who's managed to live over fifty years without taking anything seriously including love, marriage and fatherhood. Life's been one continuous gag. But at fifty one, he finds the script's been rewritten as a tragedy: he is fatally ill. His son Jud, alienated by years of neglect, comes to visit. Scottie's one concern is to make friends with his son, for everyone else adores Scottie including his ex wife, his friend and boss, and his doctor, and after a bitter, revealing confrontation, father and son are reconciled. And it is Jud who gets Scottie to agree to be rehospitalized for treatment and then organizes a giant tribute to his father in a theatre. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Buried Child

Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Buried Child takes place in an old farm house, somewhere in Illinois. We are introduced to Dodge, an cranky, sarcastic alcoholic on his death bed, and his chatty, oblivious wife Halie, who is having an affair with the local Protestant minister. As Dodge’s health devolves, the prodigal sons return: Tilden, who has come back into town after having run into some trouble in New Mexico, and Bradley, who seems to live nearby and only has one leg, having lost his other one in a chainsaw accident. Their lives are a whirlwind of chaos and confusion: Dodge sneaks whiskey even as he coughs, unstable Tilden claims to have discovered vegetables in the yard that Dodge swears don’t exist, and Bradley enters the house and cuts his father’s hair while he is asleep. It is not quite clear why everyone is acting so strangely until Tilden’s other son, Vince, comes home, after six years’ absence, with his girlfriend Shelly in tow. As old secrets from the past rise to the surface, we see newcomer Shelly try to fit the pieces together. As the family tries desperately to keep the past in the past and stay afloat, the darkest of secrets begin to come to light. Alternately funny and darkly macabre, Buried Child weaves a twisted family drama of epic proportions. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Hamlet

Prince Hamlet mourns both his father's death and his mother, Queen Gertrude's remarriage to Claudius. The ghost of Hamlet's father appears to him and tells him that Claudius has poisoned him. Hamlet swears revenge. He arranges an old play whose story has a parallel to that of Claudius. Hamlet's behaviour is considered mad. He kills the eavesdropping Polonius, the court chamberlain, by thrusting his sword through a curtain. Polonius's son Laertes returns to Denmark to avenge his father's death. Polonius's daughter Ophelia loves the Prince but his brutal behaviour drives her to madness. Ophelia dies by drowning. A duel takes place and ends with the death of Gertrude, Laertes, Claudius, and Hamlet. Themes discussed in the plot include indecision, seeking revenge and retribution, deception, ambition, loyalty and fate. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama of the seething passions that beset a wealthy Southern family whose lives are stripped of pretense in a shattering moment of revelation. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Camino Real

The dream-like setting is a walled community, from which the characters ceaselessly try to escape, without success. Only Don Quixote, who calls himself "an unashamed victim of romantic folly," has access to the outside, and finally Kilroy goes with him. Kilroy is a central figure, an ex-boxer, always the Patsy, the fall guy, who asks so little and always gets short-changed, but he never quits hoping. The other principal story is a romance between the aging, hunting Camille, and the fading Casanova, who yearns now only for tenderness and pathos as well as scenes of cataclysmic violence. The near escape of Kilroy, the battle to ride the escape plane, are hair-raising, as is the wild fiesta to crown "the tired old peacock, Casanova." No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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Tartuffe

One of Molière's most frequently performed plays, Tartuffe has been skillfully rendered into English in brilliant rhymed couplets by Richard Wilbur, who won a share of the Bollingen Translation Prize his much-acclaimed translation of this satiric turn on religious hypocrisy. The central character of the play is a rich bourgeois named Orgon, who in middle age has become a bigot and prude. The title character, a wily opportunist and swindler, affects sanctity and gains complete ascendancy over Orgon, who not only attempts to turn over his fortune but offers his daughter in marriage to his "spiritual" guide.  It is only when Orgon witnesses Tartuffe's attempt to seduce his wife that he comes to his senses. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
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