You Have No Idea

A candid and inspirational mother-daughter memoir of family, fame, trials, and triumphs by superstar Vanessa Williams her mother Helen Williams.  Since she was a little girl, Vanessa Williams wanted to be on Broadway. As a musical theater major in college she was on her way, but life took a turn when she became the first black Miss America. Forced to resign due to a nude photo scandal, it looked like her dreams were over. But through determination, and with a mom who was always there for her, she went on to conquer the entertainment world. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

Making a Literary Life: Advice for Writers and Other Dreamers

As Carolyn See says, writing guides are like preachers on Sunday—there may be a lot of them, but you can’t have too many, and there’s always an audience of the faithful. And while Making a Literary Life is ostensibly a book that teaches you how to write, it really teaches you how to make your interior life into your exterior life, how to find and join that community of like-minded souls you’re sure is out there somewhere. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

The Measure of a Man

In this luminous memoir, a true American icon looks back on his celebrated life and career.  His body of work is arguable the most morally significant in cinematic history, and the power and influence of that work are indicative of the character of the man behind the many storied roles. Here, Sidney Poitier explores these elements of character and personal values to take his own measure - as a man, as a husband, and father, and as an actor. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

The Real Life of Laurence Olivier

The acclaimed biography of Laurence Olivier is reissued to coincide with the centenary of his birth. Laurence Olivier was both an enchanter and a force of nature. In The Real Life of Laurence Olivier, Roger Lewis goes beyond the magical illusions the actor created, to tell the truth about the man’s sexuality, ambition, revenges, power, preoccupations and achievements. Most of all, Olivier’s life and work become a love story — the tale of the relationship with Vivien Leigh, who was destroyed by the extent of her passion for him, as he himself was cast into a frenzy of guilt and disillusion. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

Harrison Ford: Imperfect Hero

For the first time, Harrison Ford is revealed to readers with all his compelling complexities. Drawing on more than 100 interviews with colleagues and with Ford himself, Garry Jenkins has built up the first complete portrait of the screen's "imperfect hero. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

It Would Be So Nice If You Weren’t Here

Here is an actor's autobiography that transcends genre. Grodin writes about his share of catastrophic setbacks with candor and liberating humor. He dispenses invaluable advice about the art of surviving in the celluloid jungle. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

Going to the Movies

Why are some movies truly great? What makes an actor legendary? Which elements of successful screenplays move people's hearts more than others? Syd Field spent a lifetime seeking answers to these questions. His bestselling books on the art and craft of visual storytelling have become the film industry's gold standard, direct from the man The Hollywood Reporter called "the most sought-after screenwriting teacher in the world." In Going to the Movies, Field tells his deeply personal story, sharing insights and experience gleaned from an extraordinary career. Using a spectrum of classic movies -- from Citizen Kane to The Matrix, from Casablanca to Pulp Fiction -- Field provides a guided tour of the core components common to all notable films. These building blocks are fundamental; they transcend time and culture, rooted in the human psyche and our shared need to define ourselves through storytelling. Syd Field's profound perspective on filmic stories was the first of its kind. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More

Being an Actor

Few actors have ever been more eloquent, more honest, or more entertaining about their life and their profession than Simon Callow, one of the finest actors of his time and increasingly one of the most admired writers about the theater. Beginning with the letter to Laurence Olivier that produced his first theatrical job to his triumph as Mozart in the original production of Amadeus, Callow takes us with him on his progress through England's rich and demanding theater: his training at London's famed Drama Centre, his grim and glorious apprenticeship in the provincial theater, his breakthrough at the Joint Stock Company, and then success at Olivier's National Theatre are among the way stations. Callow provides a guide not only to the actor's profession but also to the intricacies of his art, from unemployment―"the primeval slime from which all actors emerge and to which, inevitably, they return"―to the last night of a long run. No. of copies in library catalogue: 1
Read More